Theatre and Concert Hall Programmes

Venues in Ayrshire

1. Weyersberg 1
Top2.  weyerberg 2
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3.   Weyerberg 3
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4. weyerberg 4
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5.   Weyerberg 5
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6. weyerberg 6
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7.   Weyerberg 7
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8. Weyerberg 8 
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Angela Weyersberg

A Maclaurin Trust Exhibition

1. Catalogue Cover, Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.

2.   Catalogue, Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.  Angela Weyersberg and the Big Garden.

3.   Catalogue, Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.  Angela Weyersberg and the Big Garden (continuation).

4.   Catalogue, Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.  Angela Weyersberg and the Big Garden (continuation).

5.   Catalogue Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.  Angela Weyersberg and the Big Garden (continuation).

6.   Catalogue Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.  Angela Weyersberg Biography.

7.   Catalogue Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.  Angela Weyersberg: List of Exhibits.

8.  Catalogue.  Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.  Angela Weyersberg: End plate.




Angela Weyersberg, Rudi Calonder and Hodshill

Angela Weyersberg was living in the small village of Hodshill near Bath when she first contributed to the programme at the Maclaurin Art Gallery.  She shared a large mansion house and garden with her Swiss partner, Rudi Calonder.  Apart from the varied planting, the terraces and arbours, this garden had some remnants of the Roman occupation in this area.

Hodshill2
The Garden at Hodshill 1998.

Richard Demarco introduced the couple to the gallery staff at the 1989 London Contemporary Art Fair and arrangements were soon in place for both artists to contribute to the programme at the Maclaurin.


The Garden at Hodshill 1998.

Angela returned to the Maclaurin Art Gallery in the Spring of 1998. This exhibition centred entirely on the garden and the house.  Two small works were added to the Maclaurin Art Collection at that time. Later, she retired to the continent where she took an increasing interest in sculpture. She died in Italy, in 2010.

Hodshill 1
The Garden at Hodshill 1998.




Angela Weyersberg, Recent Paintings, 1990.

Angela Weyersberg has lived in England since 1970 Drawing on reserves of physical and artistic energy, over the years she has forged a way of life in which the upkeep of a ramifying garden and the creative guardianship of a large and extraordinary house can be integrated with her continuing exploration as a painter. For Angela, the interchange between outer and inner worlds, between physical work, say, and contemplation, seems to be a pre-condition of her art.  Seems because she would be the same, she insists, anywhere - in a single room or in a cave . As an artist she is not concerned with settings, still less with decoration. Her themes probe, dangerously, the human situation: mortality and regeneration, dream and reality, love and the opposition of the sexes, self and other But the universal is authenticated by the particular; art is believable when it comes from personal experience and emotion in a given place and time.

To Angela, who grew up in Dusseldorf, England was exotically foreign. The English character (its guarded intensity), manners and institutions are still objects of fascination to her, against which she may define a different private self. Her present place, too, seems quintessential1y English in its understanding of landscape; the garden is the protagonist in the temperamental drama of the seasons and the English climate Living there, she feels an obligation to keep up the fantasy of the original bui1der/owner, the garden's creator It's as if she participates in the fantasy: it is a serious undertaking, but also a game, like assuming a role in a play An ironic awareness of the distance between role and self informs her work, itself an art which has no truck with keeping up appearances, with good behaviour and evasiveness In her paintings, the mask, or faces like masks, are used knowingly, more often to express or concentrate emotion than to conceal it.

When I first met her, Angela was engaged in a series of paintings which seemed in outrageous contrast to the Englishness of her surroundings: passionate, sensual forays into the inner reaches of the psyche Perhaps in reaction against the dark greens of the garden and cold greys of the climate, flagrant pinks and reds, sometimes with virulent yellow, purples, intense blues, implied a naked emotional contact from which the viewer, half-comprehending, could get no distance. Perhaps that is why some people, as she said, hated the red she used. But she finds it deeply fascinating and erotic, offering a womblike comfort. It's a primitive and personal colour, that of an inner sexual self, a woman stripped of all roles, indeed skinless, but uninhibited in a private dreamlike world, rather than painfully exposed. Full-bodied yet with a lightness conferred by dreaming, she seems surprised into attitudes which dramatise dangerous but thrilling encounters.

These paintings seem innocent of concept, and throw up symbols which remain charged in so far as they resist explication. Recurrent binoculars and telescopes, for example, feature in a drama of distances, relationships and perspectives (which will be important in the garden paintings) and cannot be reduced by insisting on their sexual symbolism, unavoidable though this may be. The binoculars are associated with discovery, a reaching beyond the narrow limitations of the self. They probe not just beyond, but off limits too, implying a voyeur's 'privilege' into a  private arena. A consistent theme in Angela's work has been the interior: women in their rooms, essentially female, voluptuous; women talking, in a sauna, in a protected, if claustrophobic place, from which men may feel excluded and about which they may fantasise. The relationship between exterior and interior also tests that between self and other, protection and exposure, order and chaos. In the garden pictures, the red, the human and personal, seems often to have been overgrown, overwhelmed, even violently suppressed by green.

Digging in the garden served as an antidote to the interior delving of what Angela has termed her 'outrageous' paintings. It was with a similar sense of release, of getting outside herself, that she began the garden paintings. Immediately apparent in these paintings is the robustness of their execution, allied with an uninhibited sexuality. The expressive rawness of the paint, applied with something like ferocity, allows no gentle illusions as to the aesthetic possibilities of the subject matter. This garden requires a wrestler's strength, and often seems to have been the victor, as in "The Big Garden" (surely no control is possible here?) or the "Magic Pool" pictures with their overt suggestions of struggle and drowning. And where there i s beauty, it also has the capacity to overwhelm: the "Blumenzuchterin" hardly seems on top of the situation, but to be engaged in an orgiastic loss of self, beyond the fragile safety of the glasshouse in the background. Rendered literally, the exquisite delicacy of a flowering tree might become a pale cliche; but the beauty of "The Blossom Tree" is concentrated in a voluptuous mass of pink, so that again the impression is one of sensual abundance, a barely supportable beauty. The flowers in "Garden with Flowers" show the same irrepressibility. Yet delicacy and tenderness are there too, in colours and sexy shapes. In "Garden : A Bud", the bud shoots through the earth with the curved trajectory of a rocket, irresistibly determined yet vulnerable. These pictures intuit an urgency which can scarcely be subdued by the rational concept of a garden. If their sexuality is compelling, it is inseparable from the ongoing cycle of life and death in which painfully exposed. Full-bodied yet with a lightness conferred by dreaming, she seems surprised into attitudes which dramatise dangerous but thrilling encounters.

These paintings seem innocent of concept, and throw up symbols which remain charged in so far as they resist explication. Recurrent binoculars and telescopes, for example, feature in a drama of distances, relationships and perspectives (which will be important in the garden paintings) and cannot be reduced by insisting on their sexual symbolism, unavoidable though this may be. The binoculars are associated with discovery, a reaching beyond the narrow limitations of the self. They probe not just beyond, but off limits too, implying a voyeur's 'privilege' into a private arena. A consistent theme in Angela's work has been the interior: women in their rooms, essentially female, voluptuous; women talking, in a sauna, in a protected, if claustrophobic place, from which men may feel excluded and about which they may fantasise. The relationship between exterior and interior also tests that between self and other, protection and exposure, order and chaos. In the garden pictures, the red, the human and personal, seems often to have been overgrown, overwhelmed, even violently suppressed by green.

Her latest paintings, the two diptyches, "Glaube, Hoffnung, Liebe", make a more overt statement of the individual's confrontation with these implacable processes of nature The first, uncompromisingly red panel represents the investigation of a body: a naked figure bent over the decomposing, almost deliquescent, form, as if to wrest its secret from it, and force on herself the fact of physical decay Reading across to the right hand panel , red has become green, spinal bones seem to be sprouting into new shoots; the discoverer is reduced to a grotesque caricature of attention and surprise In the third panel, the cut flowers, Angela told me, are to suggest memory and continuity; such is their energy, the vase can scarcely contain them By contrast, the masked figure appearing out of the blue (of death?) seems merely a sketchy symbol for the commemorated person The last panel, again a garden setting, assembles symbols of death and emergent new 1ife.

If the diptyches lend themselves to such interpretation, it may be because they are transitional paintings - drawing on ideas which have clarified in the process of the garden paintings, and perhaps acting as signposts towards fresh exploration It is not Angela's practice to work outwards from an idea Her images are not illustrative, but poetic; that is, the image discovers its own meaning for artist and viewer in the process of painting, or contemplation Titles are important as afterwords; sometimes tantalising1y cryptic, sometimes with an iconic resonance, they engage in poetic play with the image. The pictures draw to themselves ideas and imaginings after the event: Angela's paintings have, I find, an extended life in memory Thus the "Tables", bare structures which sternly reject a fanciful exegesis, nevertheless disturb the viewer with adumbrations of significance He may think of an altar, or a scaffolding of reason raised against an unknowable blue; he may remember, later, the Romanesque view of the world as table supported at four corners; he may dismiss an awareness of a denuded man-made world All these ideas hover beyond the pictures' frames, as it were; none of them, as starting points, could have resulted in an image of such starkness.

"Garden with White Surround" is an apt frontispiece to the garden paintings. A frame within the picture frame, its limits clearly demarcated, the staked plot asserts perspective and human intention within an encompassing, undifferentiated green. At the same time there is something indefinably mysterious and magical about this intention. Other pictures suggest telescopic perspectives -with the same sense of mystery: some view reached for through and beyond enclosing growth Only retrospectively can Angela talk about this 'reaching, which, more than anything else, informs these paintings: Perhaps I can now say that by trying to reach beyond the horizon I become aware of my boundaries, my painful shell, which serves as armour too Maybe the gardens, confined spaces, places of wonders, miracles, cosmic places, are portraits of this state of awareness about desire for understanding, knowledge, hope.

It is an imperative of art, to my mind, to dare mysteries that lie outside the boundaries of ordinary living. Angela speaks of the alternation of desire and frustration which attends such an enterprise, and of "how I feel thrown back to the activity of digging, listening, and soon observing, which evokes new fantasies, associations and again desire for the beyond "

Linda Saunders January 1990
Linda Saunders is a friend of the artist She is a writer and poet, and Assistant Editor of "Modern Painters".

Angela Weyersberg ~ Biography

Born in Dresden, brought up in Diisseldorf. Studied painting at the Kunstschule Krefeld. Worked as a designer in g1assmanufactories in Zurich. Moved to Britain in 1970 and established her studio as an artist.

Exhibitions and Events

1973
Langton Gallery, London

1975
Galerie Burdeke, Zurich
Galerie Lorenzo, Basel
Kunstmuseum, Chur
Galerie Konzen, Dusseldorf

1976
Kunstpalast, Dusseldorf
Kunstmuseum, Chur

1987
Hendricks Gallery Dublin
Washington Gallery, Glasgow
Smith's Gallery, London
Warwick Arts Trust Collection, London
Contemporary Art Fair, Bath
Crispin Gallery, Street, Somerset
Colston Gallery, Bristol
Towner Art Gallery, Eastbourne
Eye Gallery, Bristol
Camden Annual, London
Kunstmuseum, Chur
Richard Demarco Gallery, Edinburgh

1988
Expedition to Yugoslavia Contemporary Ar
Fair, Bath
La Belle Angele Gallery, Edinburgh
York Contemporary Art Fair
Studio L'Upupa, Florence
Galleria La Bottega, Ravenna
Women Artist's Slide Library, London
Monolith, The Heritage Centre, London
Nuovo Ruolo, Centre Culturale, Forli

1989
London Contemporary Art Fair, Art 89
International Contemporary Art Fair
London
Contemporary Art Fair, Bath
Marlborough Festival (Sculptures)
Wolf at the Door Gallery, Penzance
0. N. Gallery, Poznan, Poland

1990
Maclaurin Art Gallery, Ayr
Art 90 - London Contemporary Art Fair

Work in private and public collections i United Kingdom and abroad.

This catalogue is produced by the artist in collaboration with the Maclaurin Art Gallery, Ayr. The financial assistance of the Cultural Attache to the West German Embassy, London, is grateful!; acknowledged.

The exhibition in Ayr is presented with the financial assistance of the Scottish Arts Counci1.
Photographs by Rudolf Calonder.

Exhibits : Maclaurin Art Gallery, Ayr January 1990
1. Green-house, Acrylic on Board

2. Green-house, Acrylic on Board

3. Green-house, Acrylic on Board

4. Green-house, Acrylic on Board

5. Green-house, Acrylic on Board

7. A Bud, Acrylic on Board

8. Winter Flowers, Acrylic on Board

9. The Speechless Observer, Oil on Board

10. The Seduction of Guy, Oil on Board

11. Magic Pool No. 1, Oi1 on Board

12. Magic Pool No. 2, Oil on Board

13. The Well, Oi1 on Board

14. Memory of It, Oil on Board

15. Vision View, Oil on Board

16. Tab!e No. 1, Oi1 on Board

18. Flowering Tree, Oil on Board

19. The Big Garden,  Acrylic on Board

20. Lumen (Flower Propagator), Acrylic on Board

21. Room with Large Windows, Acrylic on Board

22. The Studio 122.1 x 122.0 cm

21. The Room with Large Windows, Acrylic on Board

22. The Studio,   Acrylic on Board

23. Glaube, Hoffman, Lie be No. 1, Acrylic on Board

24. Glaube, Hoffnung, Liebe No. 2, Acrylic on Board

25. Tab!e Indoors,   Acrylic on Board

26. Ce1ebration,  Acrylic on Board

27. Interior G. W., Acrylic on Board

28. The Flight, Oil on Board

29. Flowers in a Garden, Acrylic on Boa rd

30. A Bush,  Acrylic on Board

31. Garden with White Surround, Acrylic on Board

32. Seed Bed,   Acrylic on Board

33. Swiss Garden,  Acrylic on Board